Brain on a Chip?

Discussion in 'Techforge' started by The Night Funky, Aug 19, 2019.

  1. The Night Funky

    The Night Funky BMF Staff Member Moderator

    Joined:
    Oct 13, 2007
    Messages:
    24,222
    Location:
    Can't tell you, 'cause I'm undercover!
    Ratings:
    +32,009
    The human brain has some 80 - 100 billion neurons (depending upon who you ask). Ray Kurtzweil has said that once you get as many transistors on a chip as neurons in the brain, you'll have a computer as "smart" as a human. A chip with 1.2 trillion transistors has just been announced.
    :corn:
    • Agree Agree x 1
    • popcorn popcorn x 1
  2. Diacanu

    Diacanu Comicmike. Writer

    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2004
    Messages:
    82,957
    Ratings:
    +50,080
    Finally.
    We can finally start phasing out these disgusting humans.
  3. The Night Funky

    The Night Funky BMF Staff Member Moderator

    Joined:
    Oct 13, 2007
    Messages:
    24,222
    Location:
    Can't tell you, 'cause I'm undercover!
    Ratings:
    +32,009
    Oh, really?

    [​IMG]
    • Agree Agree x 2
    • popcorn popcorn x 1
  4. Zombie

    Zombie dead and loving it

    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2004
    Messages:
    42,720
    Ratings:
    +30,332
    I for one can not wait for my new robot body.
  5. matthunter

    matthunter Antira

    Joined:
    Apr 26, 2004
    Messages:
    15,815
    Location:
    Pointing out the dogwhistles
    Ratings:
    +18,312
    Nice try and outstanding development, but no-dice for Kurtweilz' theory:

    https://qz.com/114699/why-were-a-long-way-from-computers-that-really-work-like-the-human-brain/

    They'll need to pack in 30 times this, or figure out ways to make more connections between transistors.
    • Thank You! Thank You! x 2
    • Agree Agree x 1
  6. RickDeckard

    RickDeckard Socialist

    Joined:
    May 28, 2004
    Messages:
    34,956
    Location:
    Ireland
    Ratings:
    +25,691
    The problem with simulating the human brain is that you have to understand how it works first.
  7. The Night Funky

    The Night Funky BMF Staff Member Moderator

    Joined:
    Oct 13, 2007
    Messages:
    24,222
    Location:
    Can't tell you, 'cause I'm undercover!
    Ratings:
    +32,009
    But how much do we have to understand? When Benz invented the car, he didn't have a complete understanding of the process of combustion, he knew just enough to make it work.

    Scientists have perfectly modeled seemingly complex behavior in insects using just a few lines of code. Google's AI computer taught itself how to play the game Go and is able to handily beat every human on the planet at the game. If the output of a computer program perfectly mimics human behavior, does it matter if it arrives at the results in a manner different than a human does? (Assuming, of course, we have enough understanding of human intelligence to know what the differences are.)
  8. RickDeckard

    RickDeckard Socialist

    Joined:
    May 28, 2004
    Messages:
    34,956
    Location:
    Ireland
    Ratings:
    +25,691
    Well, it's the difference between weak AI and strong AI, isn't it? Weak AI is just based on computational power and while it might be good at specific things, calling it "intelligent" in the same general sense as a human brain is a stretch. When I think about a "brain on a chip", I'm thinking that the chip must approximate how the brain works using flesh, being conscious and so forth (raising the question as to whether the medium itself is important) - not just mimicking its output.

    Take chess, for example. Computers can beat humans hands down. But the way that they play is very different from how grandmasters (or even normal human players) do. Computers (with some refinement) tend to calculate every possibility and use brute force to "out-think" an opponent. A human can't do this, so they are forced to be creative. Studies have shown that in the same way that a normal player only "sees" legal moves, good human players only "see" advantageous ones. Not something a computer can do.