CS-310 if you're man enough

Discussion in 'Camp Wordforge' started by steve2^4, Jun 26, 2020.

  1. steve2^4

    steve2^4 Aged Meat

    Joined:
    Nov 11, 2004
    Messages:
    10,481
    Ratings:
    +6,869
    Need some wood gone in a hurry? (this works in the bedroom too).

    This month Before:
    before.JPG
    2 hours later:
    after.JPG

    The little bugger continues to perform.
    during.JPG

    it's light, inexpensive. Easy to start, use. Dependable.
    [​IMG]


    Purchased 7 years ago to rebuild a retaining wall, this took out the old railroad ties and then cut the new timbers at a previous house.
    wall2.JPG

    It'll sit for months and start right up. Just change the chain when it gets dull. I've replaced the bar once.

    Real men have one. :bergman:
    • Agree Agree x 1
  2. oldfella1962

    oldfella1962 light & lethal

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2004
    Messages:
    76,172
    Location:
    Georgia, USA
    Ratings:
    +28,423
    speaking of dull chains on project like dismantling the deck (and cutting up railroad tie retaining walls) were you paranoid about hitting nails & spikes?
    Nothing can ruin your day quicker! :shakefist: Sometimes I wonder if any loggers have gotten :shakefist: over the nails I put in trees with tree forts and home made hunting tree stands I made when I was a kid. :unsure:
    • popcorn popcorn x 1
  3. steve2^4

    steve2^4 Aged Meat

    Joined:
    Nov 11, 2004
    Messages:
    10,481
    Ratings:
    +6,869
    Just careful about nails. I did hit one towards the end and had to swap chains.

    On the chains, if you touch dirt, or any metal, they're dulled. Maybe someone has advice on sharpening them by hand, but a new chain is only $14.

    Keep a couple old ones for cutting out exposed roots.
  4. oldfella1962

    oldfella1962 light & lethal

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2004
    Messages:
    76,172
    Location:
    Georgia, USA
    Ratings:
    +28,423
    you can sharpen chains a cylindrical shaped file. My stepdad did a lot of logging in the winter months when he worked at the sawmill/wood products shop when I was in high school. Thus, with continuous use chains dull quickly but once you get good at it you can sharpen them up with no problem in a matter of minutes.
    • Thank You! Thank You! x 1
  5. Spaceturkey

    Spaceturkey you can't spell hatred without "red hat"

    Joined:
    Nov 23, 2004
    Messages:
    23,251
    Ratings:
    +17,952
    Nice work on the tear down - we usually go at those with a sawz-all fitted with a demo blade, and maybe a circular saw.

    It's a bitchin' saw @steve2^4 , but mine's bigger :P

    [​IMG]
    • popcorn popcorn x 1
  6. steve2^4

    steve2^4 Aged Meat

    Joined:
    Nov 11, 2004
    Messages:
    10,481
    Ratings:
    +6,869
    I have a sawz-all and with a demo blade but the going was too slow. It took me 2 hours to cut up 1/4 of the deck with that. I finished in 2 hours with the chainsaw. Of course that's not ideal for indoor work.

    That thing looks great for cutting concrete. I've got a job for you.
    • Funny Funny x 1
  7. Spaceturkey

    Spaceturkey you can't spell hatred without "red hat"

    Joined:
    Nov 23, 2004
    Messages:
    23,251
    Ratings:
    +17,952
    yeah... we use it for cutting stone and asphalt. chopped through bricks a couple of times to cut doorways out with it as well.
  8. oldfella1962

    oldfella1962 light & lethal

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2004
    Messages:
    76,172
    Location:
    Georgia, USA
    Ratings:
    +28,423
    have either of you two considered this?

  9. Spaceturkey

    Spaceturkey you can't spell hatred without "red hat"

    Joined:
    Nov 23, 2004
    Messages:
    23,251
    Ratings:
    +17,952
    right tool for the job?
  10. oldfella1962

    oldfella1962 light & lethal

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2004
    Messages:
    76,172
    Location:
    Georgia, USA
    Ratings:
    +28,423
    speaking of "proper tools" my son is using a machete to trim the vegetation surrounding his yard today. :unsure: He's renting a house in an older part of Augusta so there are decades worth of kudzu, greenbrier, virginia creeper and other plants in the yard. He has a tactical tomahawk too (with the pointy side for puncturing car doors & tires and whatnot) for the thicker shrubs, but I think he still has that here at home. Weed wackers are great for trimming typical lawn grass & weeds, but they will go through a lot of string trimming a lot of tough brush - thus the machete.
  11. TheBurgerKing

    TheBurgerKing The Monarch of Flavor

    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2009
    Messages:
    3,785
    Location:
    In a Baneblade
    Ratings:
    +2,475
    Kudzu eh? Junior is gonna need a few goats.
  12. oldfella1962

    oldfella1962 light & lethal

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2004
    Messages:
    76,172
    Location:
    Georgia, USA
    Ratings:
    +28,423
    unfortunately the house he is renting is right smack dab in the middle of the city - no goats allowed. :( But the wall o' kudzu does provide a nice privacy fence at least until around December when the leaves die off for the year. And of course birds and other critters have security which is always a plus.
  13. steve2^4

    steve2^4 Aged Meat

    Joined:
    Nov 11, 2004
    Messages:
    10,481
    Ratings:
    +6,869
    flamethrowers are probably OK though.
  14. oldfella1962

    oldfella1962 light & lethal

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2004
    Messages:
    76,172
    Location:
    Georgia, USA
    Ratings:
    +28,423
    on the campforge "manly and/or cool tools & equipment" subject I did get to try out my saw blade attachment for my extendable fiberglass branch cutting pole! The tree (maybe a green ash) has some tough, tough wood! At one point when I almost had the branch cut it snapped & folded over itself into a weird angle - I had very little leverage to cut the rest of the way through. I mean I had a strip of bark and the very outside layer of the branch which was about one inch wide and 1/4 inch thick. So basically like a couple of wooden rulers stacked together worth of wood.

    So my son and I managed to get a grip on the lowest part of the branch and hung on it to break it off. Our combined weight was about 31o pounds and despite swinging & hanging on the branch it would,...not....break...off! :brood:

    Finally we went to Lowes where a bought a Little Giant ladder. I love it! :yes: It can be used an extension ladder or an indoor A-frame ladder for reaching high ceiling fans and whatnot safely. And the ladder is folding too for easy transport and storage - hence the name. So now I could get a little more height and much needed leverage to finally saw through that last tiny bit of branch that could hold 310 pounds like it was nothing.

    While cutting more (but thinner) branches I got to use my son's brand new machete. He sharpened one edge to razor sharpness and the other edge is a saw blade (sort of) serrated edge. It has a wide guard and he put grip tape on the hilt so it's about as safe as a machete can be - lots of fun to use too!
  15. The Night Funky

    The Night Funky BMF Staff Member Moderator

    Joined:
    Oct 13, 2007
    Messages:
    31,492
    Location:
    Can't tell you, 'cause I'm undercover!
    Ratings:
    +49,152
    You don't buy the goats, you rent them. They come out for a day or so, eat the kudzu, and their hooves kill the roots, so they're unlikely to come back. Sheep also work well, and can be rented, like these guys did: https://www.news.gatech.edu/2014/11/06/little-sheep-goes-long-way-managing-kudzu
    • popcorn popcorn x 1
  16. oldfella1962

    oldfella1962 light & lethal

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2004
    Messages:
    76,172
    Location:
    Georgia, USA
    Ratings:
    +28,423
    aaaannnnd.......I just purchased yet another yard care product! I "loaned" my weed wacker to my son, but do I really want him or myself tote it back and forth? So I bought myself a battery powered weed wacker. It's a RYOBI (cordless of course since it has a chargeable battery) and I love it. So why cordless? I've used - but never owned - gas powered weed wackers and my experience was less than positive.
    Sure they are great for heavy duty commercial use, but that's overkill for my yard. So nice not having to be limited by the length of my cord or needing to keep track of my gas supply. It has an 18 volt lithium battery which charges up pretty quickly. I would recommend this product!
    • Agree Agree x 2
  17. steve2^4

    steve2^4 Aged Meat

    Joined:
    Nov 11, 2004
    Messages:
    10,481
    Ratings:
    +6,869
    Battery tech has come a long way. They make cordless chainsaws now!
  18. oldfella1962

    oldfella1962 light & lethal

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2004
    Messages:
    76,172
    Location:
    Georgia, USA
    Ratings:
    +28,423
    :lol: I had to think about that for a second. That said I was surprised to see battery powered chainsaws. But a chainsaw with a cord.....a very, very long cord....would be a whole lot of fun logging in areas with a lot of thick underbrush. :shakefist:
  19. steve2^4

    steve2^4 Aged Meat

    Joined:
    Nov 11, 2004
    Messages:
    10,481
    Ratings:
    +6,869
    yeah, meant battery powered...

    Started with a corded chainsaw on the retaining wall. burnt the extension cord (and it was rated for it). then burnt up the saw.