wow this could have been a lot worse! California F-16 crash

Discussion in 'The Red Room' started by oldfella1962, May 17, 2019.

  1. oldfella1962

    oldfella1962 light & lethal

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    https://www.foxnews.com/us/f-16-crash-landing-california-march-air-reserve-base

    everything went exactly right when things went.....exactly wrong. No deaths, only minor injuries from those on the ground. Pilot may have to purchase new underwear, but that's to be expected.

    MODS! I'm clicking "edit title" but for whatever reason I still can't change anything. Fix the spelling of California please - thanks in advance
  2. Dayton3

    Dayton3 Wonderful, Loving Husband & Father

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    Something I've always wondered. The F-16 has an unusual, semi reclined seat for the pilot. Some used to say it was to allow the pilot to endure higher G forces others have said it was simply to reduce the overall height of the aircraft (which is quite small) to a manageable level.

    I've wondered how being semi reclined impacts a pilot when he or she ejects? It would seem to me that it could cause far more damage to the spinal column. Pilots already routinely get up to an inch shorter after an ejection due to the spine being compacted.
  3. Forbin

    Forbin Do you feel fluffy, punk?

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    The ejection seat still goes up a set of rails in the same direction (relative to the pilot) as any other seat.
    The whole assembly is reclined, yes, in order to help the pilot take more G forces. But the seat is shaped the same as any other, and it pushes the pilots butt with the same vector as any other.
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  4. Dayton3

    Dayton3 Wonderful, Loving Husband & Father

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    Thanks. Since you seem to know what about the seats in the two seat F-16s (trainers)? I've seen many pictures of them. If you're an elected official in my state (like a member of congress) you can often get a ride in one occasionally. But the canopy looks significantly more "bulbous". Are the seats reclined in the two seaters as well?
  5. Forbin

    Forbin Do you feel fluffy, punk?

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    As far as I know, yes.
    Yeah, that 2-place canopy is some major piece of molded plexiglass, ain't it? There's a frame in the middle, so I guess it's two pieces.
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  6. Dayton3

    Dayton3 Wonderful, Loving Husband & Father

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    Do any U.S. fighters use the so called "frangible" canopy? Where the canopy isn't jettisoned a moment before the seat fires but is made to shatter when a bar across the back of the ejection seat hits it as the seat fires. I think I read where some of the Swedish built fighters have this feature.
  7. Forbin

    Forbin Do you feel fluffy, punk?

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    Hm. I don't know. Pretty sure most ejection sequences are timed so the canopy blows off first.
    I see some jets like the Harrier have detcord in the canopy to shatter it. I was never sure if that was part of the plan, or a contingency.
  8. Dayton3

    Dayton3 Wonderful, Loving Husband & Father

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    Yeah, I just read about the Harrier canopy. The entry on cockpit canopies said that many relied on the wind to flip the canopy up and back when it was released upon ejection seat firing. Of course the Harrier pilot might have to eject while hovering so that wouldn't be an option hence he detcord in the canopy.

    But.

    Several types of U.S. aircraft are equipped with "zero-zero" ejection seats. Meaning they can safely eject their pilot even if they are at "zero altitude" and "zero airspeed". Such as sitting on a runway or carrier deck. Obviously the wind wouldn't be a factor in moving the canopy out of the way in those either. I wonder if those have detcord embedded in frangible canopies as well.

    Remember how Goose was killed in "Top Gun"? His head hitting the canopy during ejection? While I heard the incident itself was fictional that an F-14 backseater did get killed hitting the canopy upon ejection which is why they worked it into the script.
  9. Elwood

    Elwood I know what I'm about, son.

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    I only know one F16 pilot, but I know several members of F16 ground crews. They call them "lawn darts" for a reason.
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  10. oldfella1962

    oldfella1962 light & lethal

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    I do know ejecting from an F-111 is very hard on the pilot and WSO (weapons system officer) bodies - the F-111 is a two-seater. The ejection module has to be driven upward at great force/speed to clear the jet exhaust and to be able to deploy it's parachute before the module starts to fall back to earth. Broken bones are not uncommon. Also if a pilot has to eject three times over their flying career they are grounded permanently for their own good.

    Worst ejection EVER was when I was at RAF Lakenheath, England. Right after takeoff an F-111 sucked up a flock of seagulls (no that that "Flock Of Seagulls") - both engines destroyed! :shep:
    They were going down fast and they ejected. The problem was right as they ejected the jet was flipping upside down. :( So all they did was drive themselves into the ground killing them instantly. :(
    Oh and the jet crash started a pretty big (by English standards) forest fire too. Not a fun day!
  11. oldfella1962

    oldfella1962 light & lethal

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    Yeah they don't have much "glide capacity" that's for sure. :no: Just remembered - one time (again at Lakenheath) we had an F-111 sweep it's wings back (it's a feature they have) but they got stuck in the swept-back position! :shep:So the folks on the ground had no choice but to spread flame retardant foam and lay the arresting system across the runway. Everyone had their fingers crossed as the jet came in way, way faster than it normally would because that was the only way to get any stability with such reduced wing surface area. That said it was still very unstable - there was a pretty high chance of crashing and taking out a lot of people and causing epic damage! Luckily There were no fatalities and minimal damage to the jet. Damn those pilots earn their money that's for sure!
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  12. Dayton3

    Dayton3 Wonderful, Loving Husband & Father

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    I've read that the "escape module" instead of ejection seats were thought to be the wave of the future in the 1960s. The B-70 was supposed to use special "encapsulized
    seats that amounted to individualized escape modules. The F-111 had an escape module (which could float and be rowed in an ejection over water) and the B-1A was supposed to use escape modules.

    But escape modules were proven to not be that usable or reliable at low altitudes which of course is where the most dangerous of flights typically take place both in peacetime and in war.
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  13. oldfella1962

    oldfella1962 light & lethal

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    yep - takeoffs & landings are the most dangerous times! Rarely does anything too dangerous happen out in the wide open spaces of high altitude. When I was in the air force we had a quarterly publication called the TIG briefing which detailed aircraft mishaps air force wide. We called it "the skid list" because it was full of :bergman: of course. :(
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  14. shootER

    shootER Insubordinate...and churlish Administrator

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  15. Dayton3

    Dayton3 Wonderful, Loving Husband & Father

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    Of course a manned aircraft doesn't always need a "man" in it to land safely either.

    Such as the "cornfield bomber".

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cornfield_Bomber
  16. Captain Conspiracy

    Captain Conspiracy Making Frogs Gay Again

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    That’s not real, is it?